Publications

National Security Policy, Strategy, and Reform

Orchestrating the Instruments of Power: A Critical Examination of the U.S. National Security System.

I can no longer distribute the material developed for the National Security Policy courses at JHU and UMKC. A new version is scheduled for publication by the University of Nebraska Press 1 July 2015.

From Conception to Policy: Evolution of Thinking on the War against Terrorism 2002-2004.

Published in the Small Wars Journal in 2010, it is derivative of three major studies.

The National Security Council: Recommendations for the New President.

Prepared for the presidential transition team, published August 2008.

Waging Ancient War: The Limits of Preemptive Force.

Published via the Army War College’s Strategic Studies Institute, http://carlisle-www.army.mil/, it proposes a component of national security strategy to deal with the terrorist threat posed by Islamic fundamentalists.

The Effects of National Security Strategy on Executive Branch Organization

An unpublished article written at the request of the Public Administration Review. It argues for the need to build a political consensus on national security before attempting reorganization of the national security apparatus.

Defense Policy and Military Force Transformation

Shaping U.S. Military Forces: Revolution or Relevance after the Cold War:

I can no longer distribute the material developed for the Defense Policy courses at JHU or the Roles and Missions course at GWU. The manuscript on military force transformation, however, is now available through outlets like Barnes & Noble and Amazon in hardcopy or ebook format. It is also available directly from the publisher, Praeger Security International, as hardcopy or ebook. Book reviews are also available on the Praeger page.

Improving Initial Performance of the Joint Task Force Headquarters

An unpublished 2006 analysis that considers the idea of a standing joint task force headquarters based on twenty years of hard data from all the combatant commands.

Readiness for the Interwar Period

An unpublished article submitted to the National Defense University Center for Technology and National Security’s Defense Horizons. This 2002 paper focuses on transformation driven by a shift in the geo-strategic environment from an era of great power conflict to one characterized as an interwar period.

Joint Task Forces: Options to Organize, Train, and Equip

An article published in Georgetown University’s National Security Studies Quarterly. The paper argues for pushing joint operations down another echelon from the unified combatant commands.

A Small Wars Service

An article published in the National Defense University’s Joint Forces Quarterly. The paper argues for creating a single service for small wars and special operations.

W(h)ither Corps?

Published via the Army War College’s Strategic Studies Institute, http://carlisle-www.army.mil/, it considers an issue of U.S. Army force transformation from the perspective of the corps echelon.

Learning to Cope with Asymmetry’s Uncertainties

A paper prepared for but not published by the Army War College’s Strategic Studies Institute. It is a product of the Army-Marine Corps Warfighter Conference, Asymmetric Working Group, ironically terminated by the attacks of 9/11. The concept of learning is offered in contrast to classical military training.

Asymmetry and Experimentation

A paper prepared for but not published by the Army War College’s Strategic Studies Institute. It is a product of the Army-Marine Corps Warfighter Conference, Asymmetric Working Group, ironically terminated by the attacks of 9/11. The paper considers the implications of asymmetric warfare on military experimentation and transformation.

What Does “Military Experimentation” Really Mean?

A widely circulated but unpublished paper prepared for Lieutenant General Paul Van Riper, USMC.

Asymmetry and Adaptive Command

Published via the Army Command and General Staff College’s Military Review, it considers the implications of asymmetric warfare on command and control of U.S. Forces. It offers a variety of recommendations, but focuses on training.


D. Robert Worley, Ph.D. Curriculum Vita

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